Checking the foundations

It’s one of those weeks where the diary is full and there are lots of people to meet with and conversations to be had and thinking to be done. The meetings are later in the evening than I love, the work days involve travelling a fair amount.

So today I am checking in on the foundations. I am considering blackout blinds, because the earlier sunrise is waking me slightly earlier than I want. But in the meantime, my new found habit of not drinking caffeine after noon and my Lenten avoidance of alcohol are ensuring I am sleeping well for the hours I am in bed. I am also trying to wind down at the end of the day doing some light journalling and reading before bed to switch off, even when the meetings finish late.

Exercise has been a bit harder to fit in, but I have done some yoga and a run so far this week. Even the days without yoga and running have had good walks in the sunshine. And the sunshine has really really helped.

Food has been great thanks to planning the week’s menu and deciding who is cooking each evening (I have got off very lightly on that this week). That said, I need to stop writing and go and make some lunch to take with me today!

I have had time every day to catch up with family and have grabbed coffee with friends. All the Scout meetings have been interesting and full of lovely, supportive people. And we are not quite half way through the week.

The second half of the week – that is after 6pm on Thursday – has no work (I have Friday off) , no volunteer meetings and lots of fun planned. I will definitely have plenty of time to be quiet, reflective and prayerful and to play the piano and spend some time being creative. The balance of life is not within every hour or every day, but over the weeks and months.

Smashing the running barrier

The title is very tongue in cheek, but I am revelling in a sense of achievement.  Just over a year ago, in mid-September 2017, I embarked on the Couch to 5K app from Public Health England, with the supportive and gentle Jo Whiley chatting me through a 9 week training programme to turn me into someone who can run for 30 minutes without stopping.  

The process took me longer than 9 weeks, but by the end of the process I could indeed run for 30 minutes. But only 30 minutes.  And therefore, due to my lack of speed, never 5k.  I have run a lot (relatively speaking) since completing the programme.  Most weeks I run at least once, but usually three times a week.  It is the regular exercise that was my aim, not the time or the distance.  

For a variety of reasons, the runs have got shorter, now, they’re usually about 20 minutes, rather than 30, and sometimes even shorter now that the winter makes the family a bit slower in the morning.   But still regular, which was the aim.  All good you’d think.  Except I doubted whether I could still run for 30 minutes and I knew I could not run for 5k, because, well, in my head that would mean running for about 40 minutes wouldn’t it?  And If I can’t run 30 minutes, then I definitely can’t run forty. 

Strangely, without my realising it, my head has become as much an obstacle as my lung capacity or leg muscles.  I had thought that was an affliction that only hit elite athletes who hire sports psychologists to get them over the hurdles.  

Last week was my birthday (as I may have mentioned!), I celebrated by running 30 minutes for the first time in ages and it was fine, I could absolutely do that with no real problem. Then on Friday night I was due to stay with a friend who is a proper runner, and dedicated to running Park Run every week.  Park Run is a great concept – a community 5k run led by volunteers every Saturday morning at 9am in a variety of locations over the country.  Please note though – 5k – impossible.

There was an inevitability of me ending up running with the friend and so after a great evening of music and gin and catching up, we went to bed late and I signed up to Park Run at 01:43, got about 5 hours sleep and faced down the impossible on a wet and windy Saturday morning in Merseyside.  Thankfully the rain stopped, the sky cleared and leaping puddles was fun.  And I ran for 5k.  Not quickly, but it was only three mins longer than the 30 minute barrier I had imposed.  And the friend was brilliant, chatting to me all the way round – turns out 5k gives you enough time for a good catch-up.

I am considering running 5k again this week.  Funny thing the brain.

A week of two halves

In weeks like this where work involves a fair amount of travel, I take comfort in dividing my week in half.  There are 168 hours in a week, my week starts at 6am on a Monday morning,  so the half way point is Thursday at 6pm.  The first half of my week has been focussed on work.  I have travelled to Plymouth and back and Bristol and back and worked full and productive days.  Today I have a good day planned with useful meetings and some discussions with colleagues in the diary.

It’s been very full and very work-focussed though.  That said, I have had dinner with a friend, I squeezed in one run, and have done quite a bot of Scouts volunteering, as well as getting some plans in place for family events and the pre-Christmas season.  I have also had a good amount of down time watching Netflix (I am obsessed with Gilmore Girls!) and surfing social media.   So, it has been far from all work.

It still does not feel quite as balanced as it could be though, so the halving the week is a great comfort.  The reality is that I will do absolutely no work at all in the second half of the week,  and thinking of my week like that really helps me see the balance.  And even in this last half a day of this half of the week (yes my brain does work like this!), I am squeezing in a blog writing session, I have just had a lovely ten minutes thinking through the day and I will manage a run before work.  I am also taking some time off to attend a school appointment, so there is family time in the day too.

Just reflecting on how much Scouting and me-time there has been already helps to energise me. here’s to the second half of the week.

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Photo by Buenosia Carol on Pexels.com

Enforced downtime

One very important strategy in a full-on work period was enforced rest this weekend.   I have just corrected that word ‘rest’ – originally it said ‘nothing’.  Resting is not doing nothing though, and this weekend it was meticulously planned to make sure I ahd time properly resting, and time being social and active.

I met a friend of Friday afternoon (one of my two afternoons off in a week) and hung out with the teen a bit.  I went to a yoga class and then out for dinner with the husband.  A good mix of social and exercise and a lot of fun in all cases.  Saturday morning involved a run in the rain, another yoga class and a list of relatively quick chores and a lot of laundry.  With that done then I felt very entitled to be less active.  I read, I slept and I watched a lot of TV.

I was very tempted to carry on with that on Sunday, but TV was making my head hurt and it was feeling too isolated.

Instead, Sunday was a day of going to church then having the family over for Sunday lunch. A post-lunch snooze (yes, we’re the sort of family who has a race for a sofa for a snooze) was followed by a walk in the local country park.  You could tell the dogs were happy with the return of the autumn/winter routine.

I then enforced more rest, whilst deliberately stopping me from hitting the sofa and watching more TV by getting out a jigsaw puzzle.  And also cooking an apple crumble with the apple we had found on our walk.   Definitely happy family time.

Hopefully that deliberate resting has set me up well for the week ahead.

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the first jigsaw of the season

 

Summer problems

Obviously there are no real problems with summer.  Summer is a beautiful, gorgeous, energising time of the year.

I adore the long summer holidays for the break from the routine that can start to feel oppressive.  Now that the offspring are older, the summer really gives a sense of ease.  Only me to get up and get out in the morning.  A feeling of fun in the evening as we hang out and do things as a family instead of execute a finely tuned evening of activities, transport and eating which are seemingly designed to test our life skills in every way.

The summer holiday mornings are especially precious, with a delicious combination of more sleep and more time spent with the husband.  They are more tired though, as early nights seem to disappear in the change to the summer routine.  But that just means more coffee and chat.

All in all, it is a good time where time seems to stretch a bit further.  And so less gets done.  There’s the rub.  That feeling that I have loads more time as the deadlines are softer means I don’t gets things done.  The running has fallen by the wayside.  The blogging has been non-existent.  This morning it occurs to me that I have not really looked at my diary or the to do list all week.  There are advantages to the morning rush of the school term.

But for now, let’s enjoy these last few precious days of the relaxed routine.

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there have been holiday mornings of photographing sunrises.  Delicious

 

 

The Morning Run

I love running.  That is not a sentence I ever though I would write. I started running last year in my late 40s.  I was overweight and I have asthma – neither are indicators of a good runner.  But both were the reasons to start running.  My breathing was getting worse, so some cardio vascular exercise was needed.  I was keen to make sure I build some muscle tone as I lost weight.  Weight loss is about eating the right things, but exercise helps the muscles to increase as the fat decreases.  Running was, frankly, cheap and convenient, but I hated every single run of the couch to 5k programme I followed.  Every single one.

Still I persevered and just kept running three times a week for something between 20 and 30 minutes. One day I was in Plymouth on one of my regular visits and I ran along the sea front.  And about 5 minutes in I thought “I love this”.   That was it – my turning point, I remember it so very distinctly.

Today I am once again in Plymouth.  Thanks to a warm night and a neighbouring seagull family who decided to start their morning routine at 4am, I woke up tired and bleary-eyed, but very quickly the thought that I had a run to look forward to popped into my head.  And tiredness was put aside.

In fact, I interrupted writing this to go for the run, it felt weird to be writing about running when I really just wanted to be running.

I don’t love every run, but it’s a good life lesson.  We can’t love everything we do, sometimes we just have to carry on and do it.  But this morning was a great run – one too many hills at the end, but you know what, it just felt all the more satisfying. This is a run that also ends with a treat of coffee staring out to sea.   Perfect.

A perfect run?  Who would have thought I would ever write that?

 

Keeping it small

The photos that accompany these blogs are generally not mine, they are from the free photo stock on WordPress.  This is because I am not good at taking photos.  Technically the photos I take are not great , probably because I never really think to take them., so I get little practise.   I love photos and love it when people share their photos with me, but I don’t get around to taking them myself very often.  Sometimes I have a phase of taking lots of photos, and then I forget again.  I can go weeks without taking a single snap.

Every time I choose a photo to illustrate this, I regret my lack of photography and I have considered trying to take more photos as I go through my day.  In reality that is another challenge and this was about writing, not photographing, so I am trying to resist the temptation to turn this into a bigger task.  Keeping things simple does keep me happier.  My aim is to write a blog nearly every day.  That is what I am doing, so I am persuading myself to rest in that satisfaction for now.

I have a similar view of running, I don’t run very far or for very long, I still cannot get to 5k. But I run, I run three times a week, every week and six months ago I had never run before.  So that is an achievement and I feel proud of it.  The fact that I am not trying to do more is ok for me, I am getting some cardio vascular exercise, I am getting fresh air and that is all I need.

Keeping a habit easy to do feels like a key to keeping the good habits going.